ArcMap Maximum Legend Items from a ArcGIS Server service

Recently we took a call from a user who could not see the legend for one of the feature classes in one of our services. (Precambrian Bedrock in http://mgsweb2.mngs.umn.edu/arcgis/services/state/mnbdrkgeology )

After trying some standard things–restarting the service, checking the source .MXD–I turned to The Google Machine and quickly found help from ESRI: http://support.esri.com/zh-cn/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/33741 .

Turns out the default number of legend items ArcMap will display from an ArcGIS Server map service layer is 100 and we had 102 in the problematic layer. (I plead innocence, blame the geologist for needing that many categories).

The solution was to edit the Windows registry and change the setting for “Maximum Legend Count” from 100 to something higher than 102. After doing that (see path note below) and restarting ArcMap, the legend showed for us.

Path Details
The path turned out to be a little different on Windows 7 than the paths indicated in the help article.
ESRI indicated that the path varied by ArcGIS version:

  • ArcGIS 9.3.x: HKEY_CURRENT_USER > Software > ESRI > MapServerLayer
  • ArcGIS 10.0: HKEY_CURRENT_USER > Software > ESRI > Desktop10.0 > ArcMap > Server > MapServerLayer
  • ArcGIS 10.1: HKEY_CURRENT_USER > Software > ESRI > Desktop10.1 > ArcMap > Server > MapServerLayer

I actually changed this in a number of locations–presumably once for each user profile on my machine. Each followed a pattern something like:

\HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-23412341234-123412342134-12341234123-1302\Software\ESRI\ArcMap\Server\MapServerLayer

Extra Information

Out of cursiousity, I wondered if the 100 item limit was a per service or per layer limitation so I set my limit at 103. Because the service has several other layers, the total number of layers in the legend was about 130. Everything drew OK so it appears the limit applies per layer.

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Arcpy: Check if a field exists

I was helping a co-worker who needed to check if a field exists in their arcpy script. Since we were located at their computer, I thought I would just do a quick Google search and pull the code off this blog. Seemed logical since I the original purpose was exactly that—to serve as a handy, public place to store code snippets that I use & that others might find handy.

Anyhow, my Google Search on “Node Dangles field Exists” came up with a 9.3 script to check if field index exists. And I also have a 10.0 version but did not come up with the field exists snippet. So here it is:

image

def fieldExists(inFeatureClass, inFieldName):
  fieldList = arcpy.ListFields(inFeatureClass)
  for iField in fieldList:
    if iField.name.lower() == inFieldName.lower():
      return True
  return False

ArcMap Field Calculator: Number of parts in multi-part feature

In the last week, I have looked for multi-part features a couple of times. Today, I was looking for multi-part polygons after dealing with the fall-out of a case of Clip Gone Wild as shown below.

image

I have not found a way to write a query to find these but Field Calculator does allow you to calculate a field’s value to the number of parts.

Using the Python parser, just write the formula (note that case matters): !shape!.partCount

image

ArcSDE Tip: Finding an ArcSDE instance’s port

One of my main tasks right now is to document many of the details of maintaining ArcSDE geodatabases so I anticipate having several blog posts on this topic that are re-writes of documents I am working on. I am presuming that the person will have no ArcSDE experience so I am documenting very detailed information.

Almost all of the ArcSDE commands require that you specify which instance (service/port) the command applies to by using the “-i” parameter.

ArcSDE Instance Parameter

ArcSDE Instance Parameter

Since we have multiple ArcSDE geodatabases, I like to have a handy-dandy sticky note with all the geodatabases and their respective ports on the side of my monitor.

But when that is not handy and I can never remember the ArcSDE command line syntax to get a list of instances and their ports–I mean remembering “sdeservice -o list” is difficult at my age.

sdeservicelist

The quickest and most reliable way I’ve found to get the instance number is just to check the properties of your SDE connection file in ArcCatalog, right-click on it and select “Connection Properties”.

connectionproperties

And the port is right there in the service entry (5164).

connectionproperties2

SDEINTERCEPT & SDEINTERCEPTLOC

Awhile ago, I had a ArcSDE problem that required ESRI technical support to help trouble-shoot. The problem was odd but was resolved by rebooting the server.
During the process, though, the support person had me set a couple of environment variables for logging SDE activity on the client machine.

The settings were SDEINTERCEPT and SDEINTERCEPTLOC.

From ESRI’s Help, SDEINTERCEPT specifies what activity to log and SDEINTERCEPTLOC specifies where to save the log files.

I recently deleted the directory I made for the log files but did not remove the variables and I noticed that one of my python scripts reported a weird error (but continued to run, I think). I tracked it back to these variables and realized what I had done.

Googling SDEINTERCEPTLOC did lead me to some helpful information like:

The SDEINTERCEPT blog where Ken posts ArcSDE help.

This ESRI post about troubleshotting geoprocessing problems.

And this ESRI technical article about diagnosing ArcSDE Connections.

Unsupported Arc: “Rebox”ing or updating the extent of a feature class.

I’ve found that sometimes I can not find the answer to a question until I know the answer & then it becomes ridiculously easy to find the answer.

One small annoying thing that I never spent much time was when you delete features from a feature class making it significantly smaller but the envelope does not get re-sized so the zoom extent (still the original extent) is too large. This often happens to use when we convert tables to an XY theme and there are blank records–most of our data shows in Minnesota but there are some in Oklahoma (I think). Once we eliminate or correct the blank records, our data view still pops out to include a large section of the United States even though we only have data in Minnesota.

A long, long time ago, Workstation ArcInfo had a simple command, Rebox, for just this purpose (actually it still does, I just don’t get to use it anymore)–it shrunk the extent to the smallest rectangle required to enclose all the data. Up until today, I thought the request for this feature was completely ignored.

While researching something else, I was digging around in the sde tables and found one, sde.sde_layers, that had the interesting fields, minx, miny, maxx, and maxy. My quick & dangerous test (I performed it on a throw-away feature class in a throw-away geodatabase) gave me the results I wanted–once I loaded the feature class into ArcMap, the extent was a nice, tight rectangle around my features.

Is this a supported way to Rebox the extent? No.

Is it recommend by ESRI or me? No.

Will it screw up your entire geodatabase, making you lose all your data & costing you your job? Probably not but do you want to take that chance?

Will it get the job done? Maybe.  But in the process of writing this post, I found two safer ways to go about it. First, the straight-forward, sde command-line way that probably always existed that I never found until today, sdelayer -o alter had an -E option to reset the extent, including the ability to either specify it or have sde calculate it. Ok, that is usable for one person in our organization.

Previously, we had found either a VBA or other tool for doing this but had minimal success with it. Today, I found an ArcGIS 10 Add-In that is suppose to do the same thing. In my experiments (sample size n=1) it worked perfectly. If you need this sort of functionality, I would recommend trying out this Add-In first, if that fails go the sde command line route. Use the direct SQL method at your own risk!

Quick & Dirty arcpy: Autopan ArcMap using arcpy

Question: How do I get ArcMap to automatically pan through an area.

As I mentioned in a previous post, I recently had the need to have ArcMap automatically pan through a project area. My first attempt was to print a series of data-driven pages (using a fishnet polygon layer as the index) this but that did not accomplish what I needed so I switched to arcpy, which made the task simple enough. Nothing special or tricky about this code, but just did not find it anywhere else.

The one thing to note is that I have a 1 second pause between pans–this was to allow image tiles to download. You will need to adjust the delay to meet your needs. The toolbox and code can also be downloaded.

import sys,arcpy,datetime
inLayer = sys.argv[1]

def printit(inMessage):
    print inMessage
    arcpy.AddMessage(inMessage)

mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT")

arcpy.MakeFeatureLayer_management(inLayer, "indexLayer")
cur=arcpy.SearchCursor("indexLayer")

df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd)[0]
newExtent = df.extent

iCount = 0
iTotal = (arcpy.GetCount_management("indexLayer").getOutput(0))

for row in cur:
    thisPoly = row.getValue("Shape")
    newExtent.XMin, newExtent.YMin = thisPoly.extent.XMin, thisPoly.extent.YMin
    newExtent.XMax, newExtent.YMax = thisPoly.extent.XMax, thisPoly.extent.YMax
    df.extent = newExtent
    time.sleep(1)
    iCount+=1
    printit("Panned to feature {0} of {1}".format(iCount,iTotal))

del row
del cur