ArcSDE Tip: Finding an ArcSDE instance’s port

One of my main tasks right now is to document many of the details of maintaining ArcSDE geodatabases so I anticipate having several blog posts on this topic that are re-writes of documents I am working on. I am presuming that the person will have no ArcSDE experience so I am documenting very detailed information.

Almost all of the ArcSDE commands require that you specify which instance (service/port) the command applies to by using the “-i” parameter.

ArcSDE Instance Parameter

ArcSDE Instance Parameter

Since we have multiple ArcSDE geodatabases, I like to have a handy-dandy sticky note with all the geodatabases and their respective ports on the side of my monitor.

But when that is not handy and I can never remember the ArcSDE command line syntax to get a list of instances and their ports–I mean remembering “sdeservice -o list” is difficult at my age.

sdeservicelist

The quickest and most reliable way I’ve found to get the instance number is just to check the properties of your SDE connection file in ArcCatalog, right-click on it and select “Connection Properties”.

connectionproperties

And the port is right there in the service entry (5164).

connectionproperties2

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SDEINTERCEPT & SDEINTERCEPTLOC

Awhile ago, I had a ArcSDE problem that required ESRI technical support to help trouble-shoot. The problem was odd but was resolved by rebooting the server.
During the process, though, the support person had me set a couple of environment variables for logging SDE activity on the client machine.

The settings were SDEINTERCEPT and SDEINTERCEPTLOC.

From ESRI’s Help, SDEINTERCEPT specifies what activity to log and SDEINTERCEPTLOC specifies where to save the log files.

I recently deleted the directory I made for the log files but did not remove the variables and I noticed that one of my python scripts reported a weird error (but continued to run, I think). I tracked it back to these variables and realized what I had done.

Googling SDEINTERCEPTLOC did lead me to some helpful information like:

The SDEINTERCEPT blog where Ken posts ArcSDE help.

This ESRI post about troubleshotting geoprocessing problems.

And this ESRI technical article about diagnosing ArcSDE Connections.

Data Extration Failed — Reverse Proxy Time-out

Testing one of our geodata services, we discovered that it allowed us to extract a portion of our feature class but when we tried to extract the entire data set, we received this Data Extraction error: Data extraction failed. Proxy or Gateway Server did not allow the URL. Check with your LAN administrator that Proxy or Gateway server is configured to allow the URL.

The fact that I was able to extract a portion of the data and I could see the entire geodatabase get made and zipped led me to believe it was more of time-out issue.

Reading through this thread at ArcForum led to some good information.  But Thomas’ comment that he was using “IIS7 for my reverse proxy server” and had to change one more setting led me to the solution.  In Server Manager, the default Proxy Time-Out is set at 30 seconds by default.  I bumped that up, 60 seconds shown below but I ended up going to 300 seconds and the problem was resolved.

Feature classes and Tables with names starting with “nd_”.

Random luck me to discovering a bug related to feature classes whose names start with “nd_”.  It appears that you are allowed to create feature classes starting with “nd_” but ArcCatalog will not display them.  Further research shows this behavior also occurs for table and for ArcSDE (PostGres) geodatabases,  personal geodatabase, and file geodatabases–I am using ArcCatalog 10.0.

I first noticed something odd was occurring while importing a series of shapefiles into a geodatabases.  After importing 15 shapefiles, I only had thirteen feature classes despite receiving no errors during the process.  The two shapefiles that failed to import were named ND_oil_and_gas.shp and ND_Bendix_Study.shp.  Subsequent attempts to import them individually returned an error “Invalid Target Name”.

I discovered in pgAdmin III (Postgres SDE Geodatabase) that the table existed and there was an entry in sde.sde_layers for the feature class but ArcCatalog refused to show it.

I used some un-supported methods to try to resolve the problem and despite some sweating, I failed to find a way to get ArcCatalog to display these feature classes.  I did, however, at least found a way to delete them–arcpy can detect that the feature classes exists so it is able to delete them.

At least by deleting them, I can prevent leaving “invisible” feature classes from hanging out in my geodatabase.

I suspect the problems stems from how ESRI has implemented the Network dataset table-naming structure –dirty areas are stored in tables named nd_<itemid>_dirtyareas  and nd_<itemid>_dirtyobjects.  Possibly the developer  working on the ArcCatalog GUI ended up suppressing showing feature classes and tables whose names start with “nd_”.

And, just for posterity’s sake, here is a python code snippet listing the feature classes in a workspace:

import arcpy

arcpy.env.workspace = “c:/temp/_nd/F.gdb”

print arcpy.env.workspace
for fc in arcpy.ListFeatureClasses():
print fc

print “Done!”

Renaming Raster Dataset and arcpy.Exists()

Discovered something today. I was working on an arcpy script that copies a raster dataset from a file geodatabase into a Postgres SDE geodatabase and then does some boring routine tasks–building stats, creating a mosaic dataset, adding the raster to the mosaic dataset and making a couple referenced mosaic datasets.

It sometimes has trouble with the initial step of uploading the raster because of the sheer size of if (1m elevation raster for counties) and it failed today on one. It failed today so I used the ArcCatalog GUI to copy the raster and renamed it.

I then proceeded to run launch my script. Before each step, I use arcpy.Exists() extensively to check to see if various items exist before I attempt to create them. It was continuously reporting that my raster set did not exist even though I could see it in ArcCatalog.

Finally, I realized that I needed to close ArcCatalog before arcpy recognized the fact I had renamed something. To note, I was running arcpy from a separate PythonWin window, not from the ArcCatalog session I had renamed the raster dataset with.

Once I closed ArcCatalog, arcpy recognized the renaming and life was good.

I’m also suspicious now about a problem I often have running statistics on my rasters.  The ArcTool reports no errors when I create them but for some reason the raster does not show that it has statistics afterwards.  I normally have multiple ArcApplication sessions open and now suspect that perhaps this problem is due to sessions not letting go of the connection.  Stay tuned for further developments on this.

Sorting a Coded-Value Domain Add-In (ArcGIS 10)

I am working on an data-entry application to edit feature classes that contain several coded-value-domains. The problem with some of the domains, however, is that some entries have been added after the initial creation.  So the first 25 entries are in alphabetical order and there are some stragglers at the end that are in the order they were appended.

This can be confusing for users–they go to select “Milli Vanilli” and look between “Madonna” and “Motley Crue” but can not find their favorite band there–they have to go to the end of the list to find their selection.

In the past, I have gone through the tedious process of exporting the domain to a table, sorting the table, removing the domain from the necessary field(s), deleting the domain, re-importing the table back in a new domain and finally re-applying the domain to the necessary field(s). Let’s just say I didn’t do this until someone asked a few times and I didn’t have anything more exciting–like a root canal–I could busy myself with.

But this new application contains more domains than any of other datasets so it was time to find a better solution. ESRI does have a Domain Sort Developer Sample.  It, however, did not play nice with ArcGIS 10.

So I went ahead and update it from VB 6 to VB.Net/ArcObjects 10.  I made an Add-In that can be installed by downloading the .esriaddin file and double-clicking on it.  The source code is also available.

This will add an ArcCatalog Toolbar that can be added by going to Customize-Toolbars-Domain Sorter Toolbar.

This will add a toolbar with one button.  The button enables whenever you select a geodatabase with at least one coded-value domain.

This brings up a Windows form that lets you sort any domain by either the code or description, ascending or descending.  Once you hit “OK” it re-sorts your domain.

The only problem I have had is that only the owner of a domain is allowed to edit it on an SDE geodatabase.

But other than that, the button allows you to easily keep your domains sorted.

http://edndoc.esri.com/arcobjects/9.2/CPP_VB6_VBA_VCPP_Doc/COM_Samples_Docs/Geodatabase/Schema_Creation_and_Management/Sort_a_domain/e826c5a8-9740-4f0b-86b6-d3b834735574.htm

Revoking ‘Public’ Permissions in PostgreSQL ArcSDE

While banging my head on how to grant access to a referenced mosaic dataset , I did something out of frustration that I normally would not do–I granted ‘public’ access to some data.

Then, after figuring out the problem, I went to revoke public access using ArcCatalog and received this error message:

Error 999999: Error executing function.

The Object being referenced does not exist [ERROR:  role “public” does not exist::SQL state: 42704]
Failed to execute (ChangePrivileges).

I actually expected that would occur–ArcSDE isn’t aware of PostgreSQL’s public account.

The solution was to go into pgAdmin II and revoke the privileges there.