Arcpy: Check if a field exists

I was helping a co-worker who needed to check if a field exists in their arcpy script. Since we were located at their computer, I thought I would just do a quick Google search and pull the code off this blog. Seemed logical since I the original purpose was exactly that—to serve as a handy, public place to store code snippets that I use & that others might find handy.

Anyhow, my Google Search on “Node Dangles field Exists” came up with a 9.3 script to check if field index exists. And I also have a 10.0 version but did not come up with the field exists snippet. So here it is:

image

def fieldExists(inFeatureClass, inFieldName):
  fieldList = arcpy.ListFields(inFeatureClass)
  for iField in fieldList:
    if iField.name.lower() == inFieldName.lower():
      return True
  return False

ArcMap Field Calculator: Number of parts in multi-part feature

In the last week, I have looked for multi-part features a couple of times. Today, I was looking for multi-part polygons after dealing with the fall-out of a case of Clip Gone Wild as shown below.

image

I have not found a way to write a query to find these but Field Calculator does allow you to calculate a field’s value to the number of parts.

Using the Python parser, just write the formula (note that case matters): !shape!.partCount

image

Quick & Dirty python: Converting a text file to audio (.wav)

This is a bit of a tangent but for some crazy reason, I wanted to convert some text to audio so I could listen to it while I drive. A quick Google search left me without any freeware that could handle the 53 page document–there are some cool websites that do text to mp3 like vozme and YAKiToMe! but they didn’t convert the whole document. I then found pyTTS, a python package that serves as a wrapper to the Microsoft Speech API (SAPI) , which has been in version 5 since 2000. But I didn’t easily find a version of pyTTS for python 2.6. So I decided to see if I could roll my own.

As it turns out, getting python to talk using SAPI is relatively easy. Reading a plain text file can be done in a few lines.

from comtypes.client import CreateObject

infile = "c:/temp/text.txt"

engine = CreateObject("SAPI.SpVoice")

f = open(infile, 'r')
theText = f.read()
f.close()

engine.speak(theText)

And it wasn’t that much more to have it write out a .wav file:

from comtypes.client import CreateObject

engine = CreateObject("SAPI.SpVoice")
stream = CreateObject("SAPI.SpFileStream")

infile = "c:/temp/text.txt"
outfile = "c:/temp/text4.wav"
stream.Open(outfile, SpeechLib.SSFMCreateForWrite)
engine.AudioOutputStream = stream

f = open(infile, 'r')
theText = f.read()
f.close()

engine.speak(theText)

stream.Close()

And with that chunk of code, I was able to convert my 54 page document into a 4 hour long .wav file (over 600 MB) that I used another software package to convert to .mp3 (200 MB). The voice is a bit robotic but not too bad, I just hope the content that I converted (a database specification standard) doesn’t put me to sleep while I drive.

Quick & Dirty arcpy: Autopan ArcMap using arcpy

Question: How do I get ArcMap to automatically pan through an area.

As I mentioned in a previous post, I recently had the need to have ArcMap automatically pan through a project area. My first attempt was to print a series of data-driven pages (using a fishnet polygon layer as the index) this but that did not accomplish what I needed so I switched to arcpy, which made the task simple enough. Nothing special or tricky about this code, but just did not find it anywhere else.

The one thing to note is that I have a 1 second pause between pans–this was to allow image tiles to download. You will need to adjust the delay to meet your needs. The toolbox and code can also be downloaded.

import sys,arcpy,datetime
inLayer = sys.argv[1]

def printit(inMessage):
    print inMessage
    arcpy.AddMessage(inMessage)

mxd = arcpy.mapping.MapDocument("CURRENT")

arcpy.MakeFeatureLayer_management(inLayer, "indexLayer")
cur=arcpy.SearchCursor("indexLayer")

df = arcpy.mapping.ListDataFrames(mxd)[0]
newExtent = df.extent

iCount = 0
iTotal = (arcpy.GetCount_management("indexLayer").getOutput(0))

for row in cur:
    thisPoly = row.getValue("Shape")
    newExtent.XMin, newExtent.YMin = thisPoly.extent.XMin, thisPoly.extent.YMin
    newExtent.XMax, newExtent.YMax = thisPoly.extent.XMax, thisPoly.extent.YMax
    df.extent = newExtent
    time.sleep(1)
    iCount+=1
    printit("Panned to feature {0} of {1}".format(iCount,iTotal))

del row
del cur

ArcMap Field Calculator: Identifying Unique Cases, Single Field

Seems like a lot of people are finding the ArcMap Field Calculator examples that I have posted useful so I will make an effort to post more of them. Most posts are generated after I do something and think that others might want to know how to do it. (Or so I can go back and remember how I did something without re-inventing it).

Something I did today was create a field (!Case!) and then populated this with a unique identifier for each different value (case) that occurred in a different field (!Feature!).

Note: python’s index statement is a 0-based search so the first case will have the value 0, the second will have 1, and so on. If you want to start the results at 1, you can make the last line: “return caseList.index(inValue) + 1”.

The basic structure for this is shown:

caseList = [ ]

def returnCase(inValue):
   global caseList

   if not inValue in caseList:
      caseList.append(inValue)

   return caseList.index(inValue)

ArcMap Field Calculator: Identifying Unique Cases, Multiple Fields

You may have noticed that this post–ArcMap Field Calculator: Identifying Unique Cases, Single Field–specifies “Single Field”. Yes, that was my version of a cliff-hanger post.

The basic structure I listed in that post can be expanded on to satisfy your needs. The example in my earlier post was case sensitive for example, you could modify it so it treats “a” the same as “A”.

Today’s example groups records into different cases based off the values of two fields, !county_c! and !feature! and required only minor modifications.

The calling line was modified from:

returnCase(!feature!)

to:

returnCase(!county_c!,!feature!)

to accommodate passing both values.

The function definition likewise was modified to accept two values, this:

def returnCase(inValue1):

to:

def returnCase(inValue1, inValue2)

And this line was added, creating a list from the two values passed in:

inValue = [inValue1, inValue2]

 

(Note: The same results could have be achieved by using the original function by creating the list in the calling statement:  returnCase([!county_c!,!feature!] )

 

caseList = [ ]

def returnCase(inValue1, inValue2):
   inValue = [inValue1, inValue2]
   global caseList

   if not inValue in caseList:
      caseList.append(inValue)

   return caseList.index(inValue)

ArcMap Field Calculator: ArcPy Date to Decimal Function

One of the standards in our databases is to store dates as 8-digit integer values in the format of yyyymmdd. This requires us to occasionally convert values from date fields into this format.

We can do this in the ArcMap Field Calculator using this arcpy function:

def datetodouble(inNum):
     splitList = str(inNum).split("/")
     return  splitList [2]  +("0"+ splitList [0])[-2:]  +("0"+ splitList [1])[-2:]